Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility
 

56 items found

  • 2020 Census | NOVADashboard | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    2020 Census Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. 2020 Census Results The redistricting demographic data file, the first of two 2020 Census products, was released on August 12, 2021. This file contains population, race/ethnicity, age, housing units, and housing tenure data for counties, cities, and geographies as small as census blocks. The second product set will contain more detail demographic and housing characteristics data. Census Bureau National Data and Analysis As part of the August 12,2021 redistricting data release, the Census Bureau released data visualizations , America Counts stories , and videos to help illustrate and explain these data. ​ NVRC Regional Data and Analysis Northern Virginia Regional Commission plans to do extensive data analysis of the region. Results of the data analyses will be posted on this NOVA Region Dashboard website. Initial analysis of the population of the region is available by navigating to the people data . The NOVA Region dashboard will be continually updated over the coming months with new analysis and findings presented. Check back regularly! Data Release Timeline of 2020 Census August 12, 2021 Redistricting demographic data released to the public. The format of the data file requires special software to download and extract data. Visualizations, data dashboards, and America Count stories explaining the finding will be available. ​ The final set of demonstration data for the redistricting data file released to the public. Demonstration data allow data users to compare a differential privacy infused version of the 2010 Census results with the actual published 2010 Census results. For more information on differential privacy see the "Privacy and Accuracy of 2020 Census Data" section below. ​ September 16, 2021 A redistricting data toolkit released to the public. This includes an online Data Explorer tool that will allow the redistricting 2020 Census demographic data to be easily viewed and extracted using the Census Bureau's data dissemination tool, data.census.gov . ​ May and August 2023 The Demographics and Housing Characteristics files for the 2020 Census will be released in phases in 2023. The files will contain the 2020 Census data that was not released with the redistricting data file, including characteristics of the population (i.e. age, sex), characteristics of households (i.e. household size, rent/own, families), and detailed race/ethnic breakdowns by place of origin, age, and other demographic characteristics. ​ On April 27, 2022, the U.S. Census Bureau announced a revised timeline for the final 2020 Census data products. The Demographic and Housing Characteristics File and Demographic Profile tables will be released by May 2023. The Detailed Demographic and Housing Characteristics file will be released in three phases, with the first one scheduled for August 2023 and the final two had yet to have release dates determined. ​ For more detailed information on the next data products and release schedule go to the Census Bureau's 2020 Census data products blog . ​ Privacy and Accuracy of 2020 Census Data For decades, the U.S. Census Bureau has used different techniques to protect individual privacy through their Disclosure Avoidance System (DAS). Differential Privacy (DP) is the latest technique. This technique was chosen because enhanced privacy protection is needed due to advances in technology that enable the ability to identify individuals when combined with other information. DP will impact data accuracy more than any other technique previously applied to decennial census results. DP will add random data (“noise”) to counts for geographic areas below the state level, to prevent identification of individuals. The amount of noise added to the data will be greater than any prior decennial census technique. ​ Since 2019, Northern Virginia jurisdictions, through the Northern Virginia Regional Commission (NVRC), have been participating in the U.S. Census Bureau’s DP demonstration data review and provided feedback to the U.S. Census Bureau, with the latest provided for the April 2021 round, the U.S. Census Bureau's final round of feedback. The following document is a brief overview of differential privacy and impacts it has on data quality. Click on the image to download. Download a copy of the differential privacy fact sheet (updated August 13, 2021)

  • Economics Workforce Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Workforce Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Labor Force and Unemployment Information on the economic impact and recovery from the coronavirus pandemic in Northern Virginia are found in the Tracking Economic Impact/Recovery from COVID-19 document. The tracking document includes data and trends on the labor force and unemployment. The economic charts document is updated following the monthly release of the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Local Area Unemployment Statistics .​ Tracking Economic Impact/Recovery from COVID-19 Click on image for document Latest Version released: April 29, 2022 ​ Updates will occur within 3 business days after the following BLS scheduled release dates: April 27, 2022 June 1, 2022 June 29, 2022 August 3, 2022 Minority-Owned Businesses Minority-owned businesses have experienced heightened risk associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a complex effect on the region’s local economy and on the wellbeing of its minority-owned businesses. Northern Virginia is home to 128,000 minority-owned businesses, representing the community’s diverse fabric and entrepreneurship. The report on Supporting Northern Virginia's Minority-Owned Businesses was released on June 23, 2021. The report contains detailed information on the minority-owned business community, how they were impacted by the pandemic, and recommendations for supporting them through the pandemic economic recovery and in the future beyond the pandemic. The Northern Virginia Minority-Owned Working Group present this report. The group is composed of members from the Northern Virginia Regional Commission, the Community Foundation for Northern Virginia, the Fairfax County Economic Development Authority, the Loudoun County Department of Economic Development, the Prince William County Department of Economic Development, Arlington Economic Development, and the Alexandria Economic Development Partnership. ​ A report release webinar event was hosted on June 23, 2021 to highlight the report findings. The event also included other presentations, a fire side chat with leaders from across the region, and testimonies from minority business owners. For the video recording and details on the event see the NVRC demographic webinar series website . ​ Report: The report provides a Northern Virginia level of analysis on minority-owned businesses. Data Dashboard: The dashboard provides a summary of the report findings, interactive data charts, and more detailed information than that found in the report, including jurisdiction level data. ​ The dashboard will be updated on a quarterly basis by the Northern Virginia Regional Commission. Timeline of updates are found on the data dashboard. View Report and Data Dashboard Latest version released: March 11, 2022 Additional Northern Virginia Workforce Data Resources The NOVA Workforce Regional Overview dashboard provides additional Northern Virginia workforce information, including industry and occupation. This dashboard is provided courtesy of Northern Virginia Community College .

  • Coronavirus (COVID-19) Economic Impact | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Economic Impact of Coronavirus Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Unemployment and Labor Force Information on the economic impact and recovery from the coronavirus pandemic in Northern Virginia are found in the Tracking Economic Impact/Recovery from COVID-19 document. The tracking document includes data and trends on the labor force and unemployment. The economic charts document is updated following the monthly release of the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), Local Area Unemployment Statistics .​ Tracking Economic Impact/Recovery from COVID-19 Click on image for document Latest Version released: April 29, 2022 ​ Updates will occur within 3 business days after the following BLS scheduled release dates: April 27, 2022 June 1, 2022 June 29, 2022 August 3, 2022 Minority-Owned Businesses Minority-owned businesses have experienced heightened risk associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a complex effect on the region’s local economy and on the wellbeing of its minority-owned businesses. Northern Virginia is home to 128,000 minority-owned businesses, representing the community’s diverse fabric and entrepreneurship. The report on Supporting Northern Virginia's Minority-Owned Businesses was released on June 23, 2021. The report contains detailed information on the minority-owned business community, how they were impacted by the pandemic, and recommendations for supporting them through the pandemic economic recovery and in the future beyond the pandemic. The Northern Virginia Minority-Owned Working Group present this report. The group is composed of members from the Northern Virginia Regional Commission, the Community Foundation for Northern Virginia, the Fairfax County Economic Development Authority, the Loudoun County Department of Economic Development, the Prince William County Department of Economic Development, Arlington Economic Development, and the Alexandria Economic Development Partnership. ​ A report release webinar event was hosted on June 23, 2021 to highlight the report findings. The event also included other presentations, a fire side chat with leaders from across the region, and testimonies from minority business owners. For the video recording and details on the event see the NVRC demographic webinar series website . ​ Report: The report provides a Northern Virginia level of analysis on minority-owned businesses. Data Dashboard: The dashboard provides a summary of the report findings, interactive data charts, and more detailed information than that found in the report, including jurisdiction level data. ​ The dashboard will be updated on a quarterly basis by the Northern Virginia Regional Commission. Timeline of updates are found on the data dashboard. View Report and Data Dashboard Latest version released: March 11, 2022 Paycheck Protection Program Small Business Loans Small businesses have been hard hit by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) was a small business loan program enacted by Congress for relief from the COVID-19 pandemic's economic fallout. Loans were distributed from April 3, 2020 through August 8, 2020. Nationally it provided $525 billion in forgivable loans for firms to cover payroll and some operational costs. The PPP Loans Dashboard contains a report summarizing how Northern Virginia businesses, localities, and industries fared with the loan program. The analysis utilizes the PPP loan database released on December 2, 2020 by the Small Business Administration. Click on image to go to dashboard

  • Education Student Enrollment Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Student Enrollment Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Public School Student Enrollment Overall With the explosive growth in total population in the Northern Virginia region has come substantial student enrollment growth in the region's public elementary, middle, and high schools. On September 30, 2004, there were 315,898 public school students in the region. By September 30, 2019 student enrollment had increased to 423,670. The latest two years, 2020 and 2021 have been a different story due to the impacts of COVID-19. In fall 2020 school enrollment dropped in the region for the first time since at least 2003. School enrollment dropped 16,413 between September 2019 to September 2020 and another 626 by September 2021. This decrease can be largely attributed to public school students transferring to at-home schooling and private schools. It can also be attributed to the overall decline in the region's population from mid-2020 to mid-2021. The region forecasts growth to return after the COVID-19 pandemic's impact subsides. With growth comes challenges in maintaining the high quality of education and school facilities in the region. To maintain the high quality of education, planning and acquiring land or buildings for school sites to accommodate future growth is vitally important, but has been increasingly challenging in this region with quickly diminishing land supply. ​ Northern Virginia has a transient population. A multitude of variables alter enrollment levels, including new development, transfers to and from private schools, in and out migration rates, and changing size and composition of families in existing housing stock. Pre-Covid-19 pandemic, the region had an annual growth in students of 5,256 between fall 2018 and fall 2019, which was below the average from 2004 to 2019 but well above the growth rate of the period from fall 2017 to fall 2018. The region saw a significantly lower amount of growth in students between fall 2017 and fall 2018. Loudoun and Prince William both had growth, but significantly less than their recent past. Falls Church City and Manassas City saw small amounts of decline, whereas Fairfax County had a sizable decline that caused the absolute growth of the region to be small. Fairfax experienced its first decline in growth in over a decade. According to the Fairfax County Public Schools, Membership Analysis and Trends Report, published in December 2018, the primary reason for Fairfax's decline was that out migration of students was greater than in migration of students. Fairfax had not experienced a negative student migration since at least 2010. The Hispanic and Native American race/ethnic groups are the only groups in Fairfax that had a greater out migration than in-migration, with pretty much all of the negative migration being attributed to Hispanics. This out-migration of Hispanics may have been correlated with the decline in non-citizen foreign born populations that the region and nation experienced between 2017 and 2018. See the "people" dashboard for more information. ​ Students enrolled in the Northern Virginia region's public schools comprised 15.9% of the region's population in 2004. This share of the region’s population has steadily increased through 2019 to 16.7%. In 2020 it had dropped to 16.0% and remained at 16.0% in 2021. The decrease in 2020 can be attributed to the impacts of COVID-19 when at-home and private schooling accelerated in the region.

  • People Population Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Population Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Population Overall Northern Virginia is on the front lines of a demographic transformation shaping the United States. There has been an extraordinary amount of population growth in Northern Virginia. In 2021, the Northern Virginia population was estimated to be 2,537,934 , an increase of 73% from 1990 when the population was 1,466,350. ​ The COVID-19 pandemic began in the United States in March 2020 and has lasted through 2022. It changed the country's demographic migration patterns significantly. It also significantly impacted births and deaths. It greatly impacted Northern Virginia's demographic patterns as well. From July 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021, Northern Virginia's population declined in a one year period for the first time since Census Bureau annual record keeping began in 1970. It declined by an estimated 12,000 persons. Annual Estimates Data Annual estimates of population paint a portrait of the annual growth patterns in the towns of Northern Virginia. Annual estimates are not based on a full census of the population. Rather they are estimates based on a compilation of multiple administrative data pieces such as birth records and residential building permits. The estimates are obtained from the U.S. Census, which benchmarks them to Decennial Censuses. Decennial Census data represents the population as of April 1 of the year, whereas the annual estimates are as of July 1 of each year. The 2020 to 2021 estimates are benchmarked to the 2020 Decennial Census. The 2010 to 2019 estimates are benchmarked to only the 2010 Decennial Census, and not both the 2010 and 2020 Decennial Census at this time. The 2020 Decennial Census data was released on August 12, 2021. Using the results of the 2020 Decennial Census, the annual estimates for 2010 to 2019 shown below will be adjusted later on by the U.S. Census Bureau in late 2022. Until the data is adjusted, the 2010 to 2019 data will not be consistent with the results of the 2020 Census. Key Facts: ​ 2020 to 2021 Annual Growth The COVID-19 pandemic began in the United States in March 2020 and has lasted through 2022. It changed the country's demographic migration patterns significantly. It also significantly impacted births and deaths. Whether these shifts are temporary remains to be seen. It greatly impacted Northern Virginia's demographic patterns as well. From July 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021, Northern Virginia's population declined for the first time since Census Bureau annual record keeping began in 1970. It declined by an estimated 12,000 persons. Three of Northern Virginia's jurisdictions experienced growth, those being the counties of Loudoun and Prince William and the City of Fairfax. These three jurisdictions are outer jurisdictions. The other six jurisdictions experienced declines. Northern Virginia domestic out-migration was the factor that contributed to Northern Virginia's population decline during the first year of the pandemic. ​ Natural Change: In U.S. counties, natural decrease was significantly higher than in the prior two years. Natural decrease occurs when there are more deaths than births in a population over a given time period. In 2021, more than 73% of U.S. counties experienced natural decrease, compared to 45.5% in 2019 and 55.5% in 2020.* Northern Virginia had a natural increase of 15,090 persons. This is significantly less than pre-pandemic times. From 2011 to 2019, natural increase ranged from 20,500 to 24,800 annually. A large increase in deaths compared to the pre-pandemic times is what contributed to the change. Therefore, this phenomenon is believed to be temporary. Manassas Park is the only Northern Virginia jurisdiction that experienced a natural decrease (-37). ​ ​ Domestic Migration: Domestic migration patterns in the country shifted in 2021. In many cases, there was a population shift from larger, more populous counties to medium and smaller ones. Many people moved during the pandemic when work-from home became widespread for office workers. This shifting contributed to population increases in 58.0% of counties, decreases in 41.8% of counties, and no change in 0.3% of counties.* Northern Virginia domestic out-migration was the factor that contributed to Northern Virginia's population decline during the first year of the pandemic. There was a net loss of 34,018 persons from domestic migration, meaning that more domestic persons left the region than moved into the region. Northern Virginia has a large share of office jobs . Work-from home became widespread for office workers nationwide, leading to much domestic migration of office workers who transitioned to remote work. Northern Virginia's negative domestic migration was significantly different than pre-pandemic times. From 2014 to 2019, Northern Virginia had been experiencing a negative domestic migration of between 13,700 and 20,200 annually. Eight Northern Virginia jurisdictions had negative domestic migration. Only one jurisdiction had positive domestic migration and that one was the outer jurisdiction of Loudoun County. ​ International Migration: Positive for 71% of U.S. Counties.* Northern Virginia had a positive increase in international migration, with an increase of 6,607. All nine Northern Virginia jurisdictions had a positive increase in international migration. ​ * Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Over Two-Thirds of the Nation's Counties Had Natural Decrease in 2021 , Press Release, March 24, 2022. ​ 2017 to 2020 Annual Growth The annual growth from 2017 to 2020 had been the lowest since 2000. Growth from 2017 to 2018, 2018 to 2019, and 2019 to 2020 was estimated to be 14,300, 19,200, and 11,700 respectively. Two factors known to contribute to this during this period were the region's economic dependence on the federal government and immigrants.​​​​​ ​ ​The Washington metropolitan area has an economy that is heavily dependent on the federal government. When federal jobs are cut, federal contractor job cuts follow too. The presidential administration in office from January 2017 to January 2021 cutback federal jobs and federal contracting jobs until the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic. Federal employment (excluding contractors) in the Washington metropolitan region was 367,200 in 2016 prior to the new presidential administration. It dropped to 362,400 by 2019. In 2020 it improved to 369,000 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Slower population growth in Northern Virginia was in parallel with the federal workforce decline from 2017 to 2019. ​ ​ Immigrants have driven Northern Virginia's growth for the past two decades. In 2000, Northern Virginia's population was 21% foreign born and today it is estimated to be approximately​ 28% foreign born. International migration slowed significantly from 2017 to 2020. To put this into perspective, from 2013 to 2017 annual international migration into the region ranged from 20,300 to 23,300 people, while from 2017 to 2020 it ranged from 10,600 to 16,100 people according to the U.S. Census Bureau. For more information, see the NOVA Region Dashboard section on immigration in Northern Virginia . Decennial Census Data The Decennial Census is based on a survey of the entire population. It is conducted once a decade. The 2020 Decennial Census population was released on August 12, 2021. The Decennial Census regional, county, and city population data is shown in the interactive charts that follow. Key Facts: ​ Decennial Growth In 2020, Northern Virginia's population was 2,550,337 according to the Decennial Census. The population increased from 1,466,350 in 1990, a 74% increase in the 30 year period from 1990 to 2020. Northern Virginia added approximately 320,000 people in this past decade, 2010 to 2020. This is 96,000 or 23% less than the previous decade, signaling a significant slowdown in the pace of growth. However, growth still continues at a high amount. Virginia’s population grew by 630,369 from 2010 to 2020, of which 50.7% of that growth was in Northern Virginia. I​​n 2020, 29.5% of Virginia’s population was in Northern Virginia, compared to 27.9% in 2010. Growth peaked in 2010. Growth in Northern Virginia has slowed since 2010. It has trended down annually since 2010, but it is still large and impactful growth that the the region is facing. The localities in Northern Virginia the growth is occurring in this decade is different in some ways than in the 1990s and 2000s. The preponderance of population growth of Northern Virginia continues to be located in the outer-ring suburbs of Prince William, Loudoun Counties, and the Cities of Manassas and Manassas Park. However, the share of the region's growth that is in the outer-ring has dropped from 65.1% to 61.5%. Arlington has seen its share of the region's growth more than double from what it experienced in the 2000's. Alexandria has seen its share of the region's growth become 2.2 times what it experienced in the 2000's. Intensification of developmental pressures this decade in the inner-core is a response to the millennial generation preferences, demographics, urbanization, transportation and other market pressures. ​

  • Education Attainment of Towns | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Educational Attainment of Towns Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Educational Attainment Towns Northern Virginia localities are home to some of the most highly educated residents in the nation. This high education level of the region's citizens creates a strong, flourishing business community. The percentage of Northern Virginia's population age 25 or more holding a bachelor's or higher degree is 59.5%, which is nearly double the United States overall. About the Data and Data Interpretation Educational attainment data is sourced from the U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Decennial Census and the American Community Survey from 2006 to the present. All jurisdictions in the United States are included in the Decennial Census and five-year American Community Survey estimates, including incorporated towns. The American Community Survey is a survey with a small sample size. Areas with small populations typically have a large margin of error in the data due to the survey sample size being small, while this is less of an issue the larger the population. The margin of error is shown in the popup that is displayed when hovering over a bar in the bar charts. The ACS estimates for small places are deemed unreliable if the margin of error is large. In addition to the margin of error, the accuracy of the American Community Survey data for an area can be gaged by evaluating the trend. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and the data should be used with caution. As seen in the population charts , as of 2020, 9 of the 14 incorporated towns in Northern Virginia had a population of less than 3,000, which is considered small. Due to the small size of many towns, the educational attainment data of towns should be used with caution and the margin of error in the educational attainment data should be taken into consideration. ​ A place is considered statistically similar to its characteristics of past years/periods if the margin of error causes the low and high range of today's estimate to overlap with the past years/periods. If the figures overlap, it cannot be said for certain that a figure is different than the prior year/period, even though the middle of the road estimate may be higher or lower. Estimates are considered statistically different if the estimate range does not overlap. Educational Attainment - Current Bachelor's or Higher Degrees - Current 2016 to 2020 Five-Year Estimates The population age 25 or over with bachelor's or higher degrees of the counties, cities, and incorporated towns in Northern Virginia is shown in this graph. All towns, except for Dumfries, have higher percentages of bachelor's or higher degree holders than the United States and Commonwealth of Virginia. The towns of Clifton and Vienna have higher percentages of bachelor's or higher degree holders than Northern Virginia overall. Graduate or Profressional Degrees - Current 2016 to 2020 Five-Year Estimates The population age 25 or over with graduate or professional degrees of the counties, cities, and incorporated towns in Northern Virginia is shown in this graph. All towns, except for Dumfries, have higher percentages of bachelor's or higher degree holders than the United States and Commonwealth of Virginia. The towns of Clifton and Vienna have higher percentages of bachelor's or higher degree holders than Northern Virginia overall. Educational Attainment - Historic Compared to Current Bachelor's or Higher Degrees - Historic Compared to Current Five-Year Estimates The trend over time in the population age 25 or over with bachelor's or higher degrees in Northern Virginia and its incorporated towns are shown in this graph. Due to the small size of many towns, the educational attainment data of towns should be used with caution and the margin of error of the educational attainment data should be taken into consideration. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and the data should be used with caution. Graduate or Professional Degree - Historic Compared to Current Five-Year Estimates The trend over time in the population age 25 or over with graduate or professional degrees in Northern Virginia and its incorporated towns are shown in this graph. Due to the small size of many towns, the educational attainment data of towns should be used with caution and the margin of error of the educational attainment data should be taken into consideration. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and the data should be used with caution.

  • Economics Household Income Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Household Income Distribution Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Household Income Distribution Overall Northern Virginia is known for having communities with some of the highest incomes in the United States, including the county with the highest median household income in the nation. High incomes coincide with the large, thriving business community of the Northern Virginia region. While high incomes exist, we must recognize that there are segments of the community that are lower income and in need of assistance that live in this prosperous region of the country. ​ Note: The 2020 ACS one-year estimates will not be released due to the impacts the COVID-19 pandemic on data collection and a lower response rate. The ACS collected only two-thirds of the responses it typically collects in a survey year. It did not meet the Census Bureau’s data quality standards. Therefore, 2019 ACS one-year estimates are the latest shown on this dashboard for one-year estimates. 2016 to 2020 Five-Year Estimates All jurisdictions in the United States are included in the five-year American Community Survey estimates. The share of Northern Virginia households in each income cohort is shown in this graph. While Northern Virginia is known for having communities with some of the highest median incomes in the United States, we must recognize that there are segments of the community in need of assistance that live in one of the most prosperous regions in the country. We also must recognize that there is a significant need for more affordable housing for both the low and moderate income households. 2019 One-Year Estimates Those jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more are included in the one-year American Community Survey estimates. The median household income of jurisdictions in Northern Virginia with a population of 65,000 or more is shown in this graph.

  • Economics Median Household Overall | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Median Household Income Overall Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Median Household Income Overall Northern Virginia is known for having communities with some of the highest median incomes in the United States, including the county with the highest in the nation. High median household incomes coincide with the large, thriving business community of the Northern Virginia region. While the median household income is high, we must recognize that there are segments of the community in need of assistance that live in this prosperous region of the country and that high housing costs offset the high income when it comes to standards of living and well-being. ​ Note: The 2020 ACS one-year estimates will not be released due to the impacts the COVID-19 pandemic on data collection and a lower response rate. The ACS collected only two-thirds of the responses it typically collects in a survey year. It did not meet the Census Bureau’s data quality standards. Therefore, 2019 ACS one-year estimates are the latest shown on this dashboard for one-year estimates. Median Household Income - Current 2016 to 2020 Five-Year Estimates All jurisdictions in the United States are included in the five-year American Community Survey estimates. The Median household income of all jurisdictions in Northern Virginia is shown in this graph. The median household income of every Northern Virginia jurisdictions is higher than the Commonwealth of Virginia and the United States. Out of all 3,143 jurisdictions in the USA, four of the ten highest ranked for median household income are located in Northern Virginia, and those include Loudoun County (1st), Falls Church City (2nd), Fairfax County (5th), Arlington County (7th). Median Household Income - Current ​ 2019 One-Year Estimates Those jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more are included in the one-year American Community Survey estimates. The median household income of jurisdictions in Northern Virginia with a population of 65,000 or more is shown in this graph. The five largest jurisdictions of Northern Virginia all have incomes higher than the Commonwealth of Virginia and the United States. Out of the 829 jurisdictions with a population of 65,000 or more in the USA, three of the ten highest incomes are located in Northern Virginia, and those include Loudoun County (1st), Fairfax County (4th), and Arlington County (8th). Median Household Income - Historic Compared to Current Five-Year Estimates The greatest upward transformations in median household income, to levels well beyond inflation, have occurred in the Counties of Arlington and Loudoun and the Cities of Alexandria and Falls Church. One jurisdiction in the region, the City of Manassas Park, has seen its median household income not keep pace with inflation. All other regional jurisdictions have seen their median household incomes stabilize or remain steady over time when accounting for inflation. Note, the American Community Survey is a survey with a small sample size. Areas with smaller populations, such as the cities of Northern Virginia, may have a larger margin of error in the data due to the survey sample size being small. This is less of an issue the larger the population. The margin of error is shown in the popup that is displayed when hovering over a bar in the bar charts. In addition to the margin of error, the accuracy of the American Community Survey data for an area can be gaged by evaluating the trend. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and the data should be used with caution. Median Household Income - Historic Compared to Current One-Year Estimates The median household income trend, for the regions large jurisdictions (population of 65,000 or more), are shown in the following graph. Key Facts: There were dips in median household income in the early 2010s for some jurisdictions. In 2010 was the ending of a recession and in 2013 was federal sequestration when the federal government made large budget cuts. Our region is heavily dependent on the federal government for its economy, so job layoffs during sequestration likely impacted household incomes, in addition to the recession. Alexandria had a significant rise in its median household income in 2017 beyond inflation and it has remained at a similar level in 2018 and 2019 when accounting for inflation. Arlington County has been trending upward. The dip in 2019 may be attributable to year-to-year fluctuations from the survey's small sample size, but that will be clearer when the data for upcoming years is released. Loudoun County had a significant rise in its median household income in 2019 beyond inflation . Prince William County is at a fairly similar level today as it was back in 2010. Fairfax County has trended slightly upward over time.

  • Education of Towns | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Education of Towns About the Towns Data There are 14 incorporated towns in Northern Virginia. The demographic data on the people of incorporated towns is sourced from the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey (ACS). All of the incorporated towns in Northern Virginia have a population of less than 65,000 persons. One-year ACS estimates do not exist for incorporated places with a population of less than 65,000. All incorporated towns and places in the United States are included in the five-year ACS estimates. It is important to note that any data sourced from the ACS is based on a small sample of the population of a place. The ACS estimates for places with smaller populations such as Clifton, Dumfries, Hamilton, Haymarket, Hillsboro, Lovettsville, Middleburg, and Quantico can be unreliable if the margin of error is large. A town's margin of area for an ACS data piece can be found by hovering over the town's data in a graph. For comparative purposes, Northern Virginia counties and cities, Commonwealth of Virginia, and United States data are provided in the graphs. Educational Attainment

  • Economically Disadvantaged of Towns | Northern Virginia Regional Commission

    Economically Disadvantaged of Towns Reports, maps, and charts are best viewed on a desktop or tablet. Key Facts Economically Disadvantaged of Towns While Northern Virginia is known for having communities with some of the highest median incomes in the United States, we must recognize that there are segments of the community in need of assistance that live in one of the most prosperous regions in the country. Poverty The Northern Virginia region has some of the highest household incomes in the United States. However, there are persons in poverty in the region, and their needs must be recognized and addressed. The poverty rate of all counties, cities, and incorporated towns in Northern Virginia are shown in the following graphs. The poverty rate is the ratio of the number of persons in poverty divided by the number of persons for whom poverty status was determined. Not everyone had their poverty status determined so this figure will be less than the total population. About the Data and Data Interpretation Poverty Rate data is sourced from the U.S. Census Bureau 2000 Decennial Census and the American Community Survey from 2006 to the present. All jurisdictions in the United States are included in the Decennial Census and five-year American Community Survey estimates, including incorporated towns. The American Community Survey is a survey with a small sample size. Areas with small populations typically have a large margin of error in the data due to the survey sample size being small, while this is less of an issue the larger the population. The margin of error is shown in the popup that is displayed when hovering over a bar in the bar charts. The ACS estimates for small places are deemed unreliable if the margin of error is large. In addition to the margin of error, the accuracy of the American Community Survey data for an area can be gaged by evaluating the trend. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and the data should be used with caution. As seen in the population charts , as of 2020, 9 of the 14 incorporated towns in Northern Virginia had a population of less than 3,000, which is considered small. Due to the small size of many towns, the poverty rate data of towns should be used with caution and the margin of error in the poverty rate should be taken into consideration. ​ A place is considered statistically similar to its characteristics of past years/periods if the margin of error causes the low and high range of today's estimate to overlap with the past years/periods. If the figures overlap, it cannot be said for certain that a figure is different than the prior year/period, even though the middle of the road estimate may be higher or lower. Estimates are considered statistically different if the estimate range does not overlap. Poverty Rate - Current 2016 to 2020 Five-Year Estimates The poverty rate of each Northern Virginia locality is lower than the Commonwealth of Virginia and the United States, with the exception of the towns of Quantico and Dumfries. However, due to the large margin of error for both of these towns, these towns have poverty rates that are not statistically different than the United States and the Commonwealth of Virginia. Poverty Rate - Historic Compared to Current Five-Year Estimates Due to the small size of many towns, the poverty rate data of towns should be used with caution and the margin of error of the poverty rate should be taken into consideration. If there is a large increase or decrease in the estimate from one time period to the next, and the margin of error is large and overlaps other periods, then the large change between time periods is likely due to statistical sampling error and the data should be used with caution.